Sunday, January 13, 2008

Thoughts...

..on the co-op:

1. I can't say it's pleasant to shop there - it's a tiny space and that makes for cranky customers.
2. Some things are very reasonably priced, like veggies, prepared foods and dairy (they stock Pequea Valley yogurt, my new obsession). The co-op also runs a farm, one reason why the veggies are so cheap.
3. Breads and meat are a bit more pricey, but there is a nice selection
4. You have to pay for bags, so almost everyone brings their own. I'm finding that this is a good thing for me, because I can only carry so much and I only buy what I really need. It also forces me to make an organized shopping list; I try to list things in the order I will encounter them in the store.
5. I worked for the first time last Thursday from 7:30-9:30. I chose "floor" duty because I thought it might help me familiarize myself with the store. I re-stocked the dairy case, moved crates of veggies into the cold room, vacuumed the carpets and tore apart cardboard boxes for recycling. I actually sort of enjoyed it.
6. Once the CSA starts up again, I will be able to buy everything I need at these two locations. No more Whole Foods and their ridiculous prices/congested parking lot!!

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8 Comments:

Blogger Nina and Brian said...

I have recently cut whole foods out too. Its so expensive and I have found a great market called Sunflower that sells everything I need cheaper.
-Nina

12:17 AM  
Blogger Nina and Brian said...

I have recently cut whole foods out too. Its so expensive and I have found a great market called Sunflower that sells everything I need cheaper.
-Nina

12:17 AM  
Anonymous lipcan3 said...

power to the people!

12:27 AM  
Blogger B&B said...

Have any of you read "The Omnivore's Dilemma" yet? I'm only halfway through but it really has got me thinking...

7:41 AM  
Anonymous lipcan3 said...

Elaine started but hasn't finished. I'm going to hit that when I'm done with Matisse biography vol. 2 and the Iliad.

8:21 PM  
Anonymous Sunil said...

I read it. Great book, if not a little long-winded. I also think he rationalized his way out of not being vegetarian. In any case, it really opens your eyes on how stuff gets to your plate.

11:38 AM  
Blogger B&B said...

I'm about 2/3 of the way through, and I'm really trying to read it critically, even though I knew going in that I agreed with a lot of what he has to say. He skims over/simplifies a lot of the scientific bits but at the very least he has me thinking about the origin of everything I put in my mouth. Which in turn is leading to uncomfortable guilt when I know I can do better! I asked Ryan to read it once I'm finished; I'm interested to see what he thinks since he generally is more skeptical about this subject.
Any other book recommendations? I've already read "Animal, Vegetable Miracle" which I enjoyed even though I thought it was kinda preachy.

7:36 AM  
Anonymous Sunil said...

I also really enjoyed Harvest for Hope, by Jane Goodall. It was a all over the place, but really personal. It was actually the book that convinced me to be a quasi-vegetarian (Fast Food Nation couldn't pull off that feat!).

The Newman's Own Organics Guide to a Good Life just hit the surface of the issue, but was worth the time.

I have What to Eat, by Marion Nestle, sitting on my bookshelf. It's pretty thick, but hopefully I can be persuaded to read it someday.

I read a book on the subject of where our food is coming from about once a year... to remind me why I'm paying twice the price for carrots.

9:27 AM  

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